parag

How a Parking App has Changed My Spending Habits (I Pay More For Convenience)

Blog Post created by parag on Jan 31, 2018

How a city app changed the way I pay for parking (and why I don't even mind spending more money)

As someone who spends a lot of time thinking about payments, I’m well aware of the impact of frictionless (or invisible) payments. Recently I witnessed a change in my spending habits due to payments innovation.

 

A decade ago Amazon revolutionized the ecommerce world with its one click checkout and countless merchants followed this trend -- or at least tried. Technology behemoths and Silicon Valley startups lead the way with innovative payment methods that make our shopping experience seamless.

 

While the retail and ecommerce world continue to race ahead, government and utilities are only now catching up. I’ve never been a fan of cash and much less nickels and dimes, so the fact that we have to pay parking meters with quarters always put me in a tough spot. Where are the darn quarters! Making a trip to the bank or supermarket to load up on quarters is always a hassle (no ATM gives bills less than $20). As a result, often within the city I end up taking the cab to avoid parking meters.

 

How can I get this important service – parking my car -- without the hassle and unnecessary friction of using cash? Enter the new mobile app - BostonPark which lets me store my vehicle details and card payment info. Whenever I’m near a parking spot it tells me how much parking time is left as well as the street cleaning schedule -- so I can avoid parking fines!. Since Boston has different times for resident parking and metered parking, it allows me to pay remotely if I’m running late. If I decide to stay longer and want to extend the parking time, I no longer have to rush. No more worrying about the dreadful orange violation ticket on my car window shield. The best part – no more scavenging for quarters!

 

This app has significantly changed my parking spending habit. As government agencies introduce more digital services and make payments easier, consumers like me will likely use the government service rather than alternatives (for example, driving and parking instead of taking an Uber). I look forward more frictionless experiences in public services!

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